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Practicing Human Geography

by Paul Cloke et al SAGE Publications Ltd
Pub Date:
04/2004
ISBN:
9780761973003
Format:
Pbk 440 pages
Price:
AU$134.00 NZ$138.26
Product Status: Available in Approx 14 days
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Available as eBook
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Practising Human Geography is critical introduction to disciplinary debates about the practise of human geography, that is informed by an inquiry into how geographers actually do research. In examining those methods and practices that are integral to doing geography, the text presents a theoretically-informed reflection on the construction and interpretation of geographical data - including factual and 'fictional' sources; the use of core research methodologies; and the interpretative role of the researcher. Framed by an historical overview how ideas of practising human geography have changed, the following three sections offer an comprehensive and integrated overview of research methodologies. Illustrated throughout, the text is punctuated by bibliographically-referenced text boxes offering definitions of key terms. Practising Human Geography will introduce geographers - from undergraduate to faculty - to the core issues that inform research design and practise.

Changing Practices of Human Geography An Introduction PART ONE: CONSTRUCTING GEOGRAPHICAL DATA Official Sources Non-official Sources Imaginative Sources Talking to People Observing, Participating and Ethnographies PART TWO: CONSTRUCTING GEOGRAPHICAL INTERPRETATIONS Sifting and Sorting Enumerating Explaining Understanding Representing Human Geographies The Politics of Practising Human Geography

`Practising Human Geography is a god-send for students. Written in an accessible and engaging style, the book demystifies the study of geographical methodology, offering a wealth of practical advice from the authors' own research experience. This is not a manual of approved geographical techniques. It is a reflexive, critical and highly personal account, combining historical depth with up-to-the-minute examples of research in practice. Practising Human Geography is a comprehensive and theoretically informed introduction to the practices of fieldwork, data collection, interpretation and writing, enabling students to make sense of their own data and to develop a critical perspective on the existing literature. The book makes complicated ideas approachable through the effective use of case studies and a firm grasp of contemporary debates' - Peter Jackson, Professor of Human Geography, University of Sheffield
Ian is a cultural geographer with longstanding interests in material geographies, multi-sited ethnographic research, connective aesthetics and critical pedagogy. He combines these in/as afollow the thinga work. In recent years he has added to these interests new media ecology and commodity activism, after experimenting with blogging as a means to write collaboratively about the geographies of food, and with web design to create followthethings.com, a spoof online shop, resource, database and fieldsite stocked with provocative afollow the thinga work by academics, students, filmmakers, artists, journalists and others. Within Geography at Exeter, Ian is Director of Communications and External Relations and Equality and Diversity rep.Ian is also the cultural geography editor of Geography Compass and serves on the editorial boards of Qualitative Research and Geography. He is an Associate of the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes University, an academic advisory board member of Students and Scholars Against Corporate Misbehavior, and a trustee of the Geographical Association.Ian often writes as aIan Cook et ala in order to acknowledge the collaborative nature of all of his work.CareerIan graduated from UCL in 1986 with a BSc in Human Sciences, from the University of Kentucky in 1992 with an MA in Human Geography, and from the University of Bristol in 1997 with a PhD in Human Geography. He began his academic career at the University of Wales, Lampeter (1993-9), then worked at the University of Birmingham (1999-2007), before moving to Exeter in August 2007.