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Critical race theory and inequality in the labour market: Racial stratification in Ireland

by Ebun Joseph Manchester University Press
Pub Date:
07/2020
ISBN:
9781526134394
Format:
Hbk 256 pages
Price:
AU$199.00 NZ$204.35
Product Status: Out of stock. Not available to order.
This book employs critical race theory as a theoretical and analytical framework to unveil how racial stratification shapes the socioeconomic outcomes and racial inequality in the labour market. The pages guide students interested in CRT and investigating racism, discrimination and inequality.

List of figures
List of tables
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1 Race: The unmarked marker in racialised hierarchical social systems
2 Migration, whiteness and Irish racism
3 Evidence of racial stratification in Ireland: Comparing the labour market outcomes of Spanish, Polish and Nigerian migrants
4 A framework for exposing racial stratification: Theory and methodology
5 Knowing your place: Racial stratification as a 'default' starting position
6 Intersecting stratifiers: How migrants change their place on the labour supply chain
7 Minority agency, experiences and reconstructed identities: How migrants negotiate racially stratifying systems
8 Policing the racial order through the group favouritism continuum
Conclusion: Towards critical race theory in labour market
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