Request Inspection Copy

If you are an Academic or Teacher and wish to consider this book as a prescribed textbook for your course, you may be eligible for a complimentary inspection copy. Please complete this form, including information about your position, campus and course, before adding to cart.

* Required Fields

To complete your Inspection Copy Request you will need to click the Checkout button in the right margin and complete the checkout formalities. You can include Inspection Copies and purchased items in the same shopping cart, see our Inspection Copy terms for further information.

Any Questions? Please email our text Support Team on text@footprint.com.au

Submit

Email this to a friend

* ALL required Fields

Order Inspection Copy

An inspection copy has been added to your shopping cart

Black Music Matters: Jazz and the Transformation of Music Studies

by Ed Sarath Rowman and Littlefield
Pub Date:
09/2018
ISBN:
9781538111703
Format:
Hbk 256 pages
Price:
AU$135.00 NZ$134.78
Product Status: Available in Approx 9 days
add to your cart
Black Music Matters: Jazz and the Transformation of Music Studies is among the first books to examine music studies reform through the lens of African American music, as well as the emergent field of consciousness studies. It is inspired by conversations on race and a rich body of literature on the place of black music in American culture.


Sarath engages the reader in the critical questions facing us today, how we understand, maintain, uphold, and use American heritages of Black music culture and appreciate its importance globally. His thesis and arguments are sound, soulful, and hugely sensible.
Ed Sarath is professor of music at the University of Michigan, director of the U-M Program in Creativity and Consciousness Studies, and is active worldwide as a performer, composer, recording artist, and scholar. He is founder and president of the International Society for Improvised Music and is lead author of the widely read CMS Manifesto, which appears in the coauthored book Redesigning Music Studies in an Age of Change.