Request Inspection Copy

If you are an Academic or Teacher and wish to consider this book as a prescribed textbook for your course, you may be eligible for a complimentary inspection copy. Please complete this form, including information about your position, campus and course, before adding to cart.

* Required Fields

To complete your Inspection Copy Request you will need to click the Checkout button in the right margin and complete the checkout formalities. You can include Inspection Copies and purchased items in the same shopping cart, see our Inspection Copy terms for further information.

Any Questions? Please email our text Support Team on text@footprint.com.au

Submit

Email this to a friend

* ALL required Fields

Order Inspection Copy

An inspection copy has been added to your shopping cart

Unintended Consequences: The Impact of Factor Endowments, Culture, and Politics on Long-Run Economic Performance

by Deepak Lal The MIT Press
Pub Date:
07/2001
ISBN:
9780262621540
Format:
Pbk 304 pages
Price:
AU$68.00 NZ$71.30
Product Status: Available in Approx 14 days
add to your cart
Deepak Lal is the James S. Coleman Professor of International Development Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, and was at ANU, Canberra Examines international economic performance & how it is influenced by the levels of labour, land, capital & skills & the relevance of history, anthropology & evolutionary biology as well as the influence of culture. In this book, based on the 1995 Ohlin Lectures, Deepak Lal provides an accessible, interdisciplinary account of the role of culture in shaping economic performance. Topics addressed include a possible future 'clash of civilizations,' the role of Asian values in the East Asian economic miracle, the cultural versus economic causes of social decay in the West, and whether modernization leads to Westernization. Lal makes an important distinction between material and cosmological beliefs, showing how both were initially shaped by factor endowments and how they have evolved in response to changing historical pressures in different civilizations. Lal's first major theme is the interaction of factor endowments, culture, and politics in explaining modern intensive growth in the West. The other major theme is the role of individualism--an inadvertent legacy of the medieval Catholic Church--in promoting this growth, and the strange metamorphoses this has caused in both the West's cosmological beliefs and the interaction between 'the West and the rest.' Lal takes account of the relevant literature in history, anthropology, social psychology, evolutionary biology, neurology, and sociology, and the economic history of the regions and cultures that form Eurasia. An appendix shows how the stories Lal tells can be described by four formal economic models.
Deepak Lal is the James S. Coleman Professor of International Development Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.