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Impact of International Trade on Wages

by Robert C. Feenstra University of Chicago Press
Pub Date:
01/2000
ISBN:
9780226239637
Format:
Hbk 416 pages
Price:
AU$192.00 NZ$199.13
Product Status: Available in Approx 14 days
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Since the early s, the U.S. economy has experienced a growing wage differential: high-skilled workers have claimed an increasing share of available income, while low-skilled workers have seen an absolute decline in real wages. How and why this disparity has arisen is a matter of ongoing debate among policymakers and economists. Two competing theories have emerged to explain this phenomenon, one focusing on international trade and labor market globalization as the driving force behind the devaluation of low-skill jobs, and the other focusing on the role of technological change as a catalyst for the escalation of high-skill wages.This collection brings together innovative new ideas and data sources in order to provide more satisfying alternatives to the trade versus technology debate and to assess directly the specific impact of international trade on U.S. wages. This timely volume offers a thorough appraisal of the wage distribution predicament, examining the continued effects of technology and globalization on the labor market.
Robert C. Feenstra is associate professor of economics at the University of California at Davis and is coeditor of the ''Journal for International Economics."