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Global Epidemiology of Noncommunicable Diseases: The Epidemiology and Burdens of Cancers, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diabetes Mellitus, Respiratory Disorders, and Other Major Conditions

by Christopher J. L. Murray and Alan D. Lopez Harvard School of Public Health
Pub Date:
03/2019
ISBN:
9780674354470
Format:
Hbk 500 pages
Price:
AU$104.00 NZ$108.70
Product Status: Available in Approx 14 days
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Over 50 percent of all deaths worldwide are from noncommunicable diseases. The results of the Global Burden of Disease Study dispel the notions that these noncommunicable diseases are related to affluence. In all developing regions, except for India and sub-Saharan Africa, noncommunicable diseases are responsible for more deaths than infectious diseases, and deaths have been projected to climb. This volume provides comprehensive data and detailed discussions of the epidemiologies of all major cancers and cardiovascular conditions, as well as those of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, ulcers, diabetes, nephritis, cirrhosis, and appendicitis.
Christopher Murray is Associate Professor of International Health Economics at the Harvard School of Public Health. Alan Lopez is a scientist in the Programme on Substance Abuse at the World Health Organization, Geneva.