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Musings on Mortality: From Tolstoy to Primo Levi

by Victor Brombert University of Chicago Press
Pub Date:
11/2015
ISBN:
9780226323824
Format:
Pbk 200 pages
Price:
AU$39.99 NZ$40.86
Product Status: Out of stock. Not available to order.
“All art and the love of art,” Victor Brombert writes at the beginning of the deeply personal Musings on Mortality, “allow us to negate our nothingness.” As a young man returning from World War II, Brombert came to understand this truth as he immersed himself in literature. Death can be found everywhere in literature, he saw, but literature itself is on the side of life. With delicacy and penetrating insight, Brombert traces the theme of mortality in the work of a group of authors who wrote during the past century and a half, teasing out and comparing their views of death as they emerged from vastly different cultural contexts.

Leo Tolstoy, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Virginia Woolf, Albert Camus, Giorgio Bassani, J. M. Coetzee, and Primo Levi - these are the writers whose works Brombert plumbs, illuminating their views on the meaning of life and the human condition. But there is more to their work, he shows, than a pervasive interest in mortality: they wrote not only of physical death but also of the threat of moral and spiritual death - and as the twentieth century progressed, they increasingly reflected on the traumatic events of their times and the growing sense of a collective historical tragedy. He probes the individual struggle with death, for example, through Tolstoy’s Ivan Ilych and Mann’s Aschenbach, while he explores the destruction of whole civilizations in Bassani, Camus, and Primo Levi. For Kafka and Woolf, writing seems to hold the promise of salvation, though that promise is seen as ambiguous and even deceptive, while Coetzee, writing about violence and apartheid South Africa, is deeply concerned with a sense of disgrace. Throughout the book, Brombert roots these writers’ reflections in philosophical meditations on mortality. Ultimately, he reveals that by understanding how these authors wrote about mortality, we can grasp the full scope of their literary achievement and vision.

Drawing deeply from the well of Brombert’s own experience, Musings on Mortality is more than mere literary criticism: it is a moving and elegant book for all to learn and live by.

Prologue: “To Negate Our Nothingness”
1 Tolstoy: “Caius Is Mortal” 2 Thomas Mann and the Lure of the Abyss 3 Kafka: The Death Journey in the Everlasting Present 4 Virginia Woolf: “Death Is the Enemy” 5 Albert Camus: The Endless Defeat 6 Giorgio Bassani: “Even Objects Die” 7 J. M. Coetzee and the Scandal of Death 8 Primo Levi: The Flawed Design
Epilogue
AcknowledgmentsNotesIndex of Names

“In these essays, Brombert reads these writers’ oeuvres closely with a judicious and restrained eye towards biographical influence and sets them within their larger historical contexts.”
 
“An engagingly personal book.”
 
“Much more than mere ‘musings on mortality.’”
Victor Brombert is the Henry Putnam University Professor Emeritus of Romance and Comparative Literatures at Princeton University. He is the author of many books, including In Praise of Antiheroes: Figures and Themes in Modern European Literature, 1830 and ndash;l980, also published by the University of Chicago Press, and the wartime memoir Trains of Thought.