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GiveBack Economy: Social Responsiblity Practices for Business and Nonprofit

by Peter Miller and Carla Langhorst Self-Counsel Press
Pub Date:
10/2017
ISBN:
9781770402942
Format:
Pbk 176 pages
Price:
AU$29.99 NZ$33.03
Product Status: In Stock Now
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The GiveBack Economy is heating up, but does it really matter if an organization is doing the right thing? And how does an organization do the right thing, anyway?


 


Social innovation and social enterprise are interrelated concepts that, once understood, can help you take your business into this new economy. You might think of Starbucks and their fair trade program, or Walmart with their active involvement in fundraising, as social causes might be considered social enterprises. Some businesses are solely about giving back, and are leading the way in these exciting times. Recent surveys indicate that more than 99 percent of people want to feel they are giving back in some way. This book will show you how to help people do that.


 

1 The New Economy Is Here 1 1. What Are Social Innovation and Social Enterprise? 4 1.1 What is social innovation? 4 1.2 What is social enterprise? 5 1.3 How are the definitions different internationally? 6 1.4 Why is the definition of social enterprise important? 6 2 Corporate Social Responsibility for Everyone 9 1. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) 10 1.1 CSR for large businesses (multinational corporations) 12 1.2 CSR for small and medium businesses 14 2. How Does CSR Work in Business? 16 2.1 Sponsorship 16 2.2 Fundraising 16 2.3 Customer base 17 2.4 Employee base 17 2.5 Corporate foundations 18 2.6 In-kind support 18 3. Social Investment 19 4. How to Start CSR in Your Business 19 4.1 Pick your CSR team 20 4.2 Gather resources 20 4.3 Understand the issues 20 4.4 Learn about the organizations 20 4.5 Theory of change 21 iv The GiveBack Economy 4.6 Choose how to get involved 23 4.7 Communicate 23 5. CSR in Nonprofit and Social Enterprises 28 5.1 CSR steps for social innovation and social enterprise 29 5.2 The key: Recognition and thanks 30 6. Relationship Benefits for Nonprofits, Charities, and Social Enterprise 31 3 Yo ur Social Idea 33 1. Can Your Idea Change the World? 33 2. Where Do These Ideas Come From? 35 2.1 Your life and personal experiences 35 2.2 Work experience 36 2.3 Your knowledge 36 2.4 Hobbies 37 2.5 New information 37 2.6 New technology 37 2.7 New research 38 2.8 Feedback 38 2.9 New marketplace 39 2.10 Clash of life and new information 39 3. Identifying the Problem: Social Issues and Concerns 41 3.1 Types of social challenges 41 3.2 How to know if it is really a problem 43 4. Can You Solve This for the People to Whom It Matters? 48 4.1 Clients 49 4.2 Volunteers and staff 49 4.3 Donors and foundations 50 4.4 Community partners and other stakeholders 50 5. Proof of Concept 50 5.1 Get volunteers 52 5.2 Get partners 52 5.3 Get donors or investors 52 5.4 Get clients 53 4 M arketing Yo ur Social Initiative 55 1. Marketing Mix (The 4 Ps of Marketing) 56 2. How Is Marketing Different for a Social Initiative? 57 contents v 2.1 Marketing Partnerships for Social Enterprises 58 2.2 Product: Social initiative offerings 59 2.3 Programs 61 2.4 Memberships/subscriptions 61 2.5 Events 62 3. Price: Social Enterprise Revenue Generation Sources 62 3.1 Fee for service (or product) 63 3.2 Cooperative/membership 64 3.3 Cross-compensation (partially/ fully subsidized models) 64 3.4 Skills development 65 3.5 Market intermediary/broker 65 3.6 Marketing 66 3.7 Administration 66 3.8 Distribution networks 66 3.9 Relationships 67 3.10 Sponsorship or corporate social responsibility 67 3.11 Blended models 68 4. Place: Social Enterprise Distribution Models 69 4.1 Direct to client 70 4.2 Resellers/channel partners 70 4.3 Overseas partnerships 71 4.4 Online store/direct access using technology 71 5. Promotion of a Social Enterprise 72 5.1 Advertising 73 5.2 Public relations 76 5.3 Sales team and channel partner sales 78 5.4 Promotions of various types 79 5.5 Other Marketing Strategies 81 5 Yo ur Team 87 1. Recruit Volunteers, Staff, and Everyone in Between 87 2. Define Roles, Recruit, Train, Retain, and Recognize! 88 3. Who Is Your Team? 89 3.1 Management and support team 89 3.2 Board of directors 91 3.3 Patrons 92 3.4 Volunteer board of advisors 93 vi The GiveBack Economy 3.5 Committees 96 3.6 Ambassadors and community teams 104 3.7 Peers 106 3.8 Mentors and/or coaches 106 3.9 Paid advisors 106 4. Recruitment 107 4.1 The job description 107 4.2 Recruiting the core group 108 4.3 External recruitment 109 5. Training 110 5.1 Orientation training 110 5.2 Ongoing training 111 5.3 Training methods 112 6. Retention 112 7. Recognition 113 6 Ho w the Organization Wo rks 115 1. Start-up Tasks 116 1.1 Step 1: Space needs assessment 116 1.2 Step 2: Find space 116 1.3 Step 3: Equipment 117 1.4 Step 4: Monthly expenses 118 1.5 Step 5: Organization registration 119 1.6 Step 6: Banking 120 1.7 Step 7: Marketing basics 120 1.8 Step 8: Selecting paid advisors 121 2. Day-to-Day Activities 122 2.1 Governance 122 2.2 Administration 123 3. Technology 124 3.1 Telephone system 124 3.2 Email 125 3.3 Software 126 3.4 Website/online store 127 3.5 Payroll and bookkeeping 128 3.6 Security 128 contents vii 4. Periodic Tasks 129 4.1 Banking 129 4.2 Insurance 129 4.3 Accounting 129 4.4 Legal arrangements 130 5. Operations Guide 130 7 Fin ance in the Social Sector 133 1. Nonprofits and Social Enterprises Are Businesses in Many Ways 134 2. Making Profit in the Nonprofit World 135 2.1 Donations 136 2.2 Fundraising events 136 2.3 Sponsorships 137 2.4 Granting 137 2.5 Membership fees 138 2.6 Sale of product and services 139 2.7 Investment 139 3. Financial Planning 142 3.1 The financial plan 143 4. Financial Sourcing 144 4.1 Grants 144 4.2 Loans 145 4.3 Philanthropic angel investors/venture capitalists 145 4.4 Community bond 146 4.5 Crowdfunding online 146 5. Monitoring 147 5.1 Record keeping 147 5.2 Banking reports 147 5.3 Investor reports 147 5.4 Stakeholder reports 148 8 Actions Speak Louder Than Wo rds 149 1. Introduction to Action Plans 150 2. The Strategic Plan 151 2.1 The vision 151 2.2 The mission 155 2.3 The future of strategy 155 viii The GiveBack Economy 3. The Action Plan 156 3.1 Implementation plan 156 4. Measuring Results 158 4.1 Inputs 159 4.2 Outputs 159 4.3 Outcomes 160 4.4 Impact 160 5. Bringing It Together 161 Conclusion: The Future of Social Enterprise and Social Innovation 163 1. A Focus on Growth 165 2. Collaboration and Partnerships 165 3. Top of Mind Awareness in the Media and Society As a Whole 165 download kit 166 samples 1 CSR Model — Policy, Processes, and Procedures 21 2 Researching & Assessing Organizations to Work With 22 3 Forms of Involvement 24 4 Proposal Development 25 5 Benefits 26 6 Agenda & Discussion Plan 27 7 Implementation Plan 27 8 Problem & Solution(s) 30 9 Round Table Agenda 46 10 Proof of Concept 52 11 Advisory Board Details 57 12 Committees Details 97 13 Orientation Training 112 14 Soup Kitchen SWOT 157 tables 1 Marketing Mix Comparison 57 2 Vision to Mission 155

Peter Miller was with CIBC for 27 years then started first of 6 businesses, taught entrepreneurship social enterprise and marketing at Seneca and Centennial and Sheridan Colleges including a Non-profit Leadership Program at Seneca, on-line MBA students through Centenary College in New Jersey; workshops and coaching for unemployed/underemployed (over 720) through Seneca and Centennial Centres of Excellence and YMCA Business Centre and Centennial Summer Company Program.

Carla Langhorst’s background in corporate as well as entrepreneurial ventures gives her a breadth of knowledge. Her past experience includes marketing at Coca-Cola Canada, sales at McCain Foods, sales and training development at Canadian Pacific Railway, franchisee training and sales execution at Director of Operations at The Nines Consulting Group, an undergrad at Wilfrid Laurier Business School with an exchange to Australia, and an MBA at the University of British Columbia with an exchange to Shanghai, China. Most recently, she is an instructor at Humber College in the continuous education department, a volunteer at the YMCA Business Development Centre, and is working with the United Church of Canada to development a knowledge sharing platform for the Canadian non-profit industry.