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Technoscience In Contemporary American Film: Beyond Science Fiction

by Aylish Wood Manchester University Press
Pub Date:
07/2002
ISBN:
9780719057731
Format:
Pbk 208 pages
Price:
AU$42.99 NZ$43.47
Product Status: Available in Approx 14 days
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'Technoscience in contemporary American film' is an innovative analysis of images of science and technology from popular films of the 1980s and 1990s. It argues that films as diverse as the science fiction film 'Jurassic Park', the melodrama 'Lorenzo's Oil' and the 'Gremlin' comic fantasies contribute to popular understandings of science and technology.

Introducing ideas from technoscience studies, Aylish Wood shows that films such as 'Twelve monkeys', 'Lawnmower man' and 'Strange days' explore the complex social, cultural and economic intersections that lead to the generation of scientific knowledge, and the different ways that such knowledge emerges within the world. Moving beyond the idea that technoscience is simply either good or bad, this study examines the often ambiguous relationship between humans and technoscience, through an analysis of individual films including 'Edward Scissorhands', 'Android' and 'GATTACA'.

Providing an accessible introduction to contemporary ideas about technoscience, it also broadens the debates about images of science and technology beyond the science fiction and horror genres into an alternative body of films: fictions of technoscience.

This book will be of interest for second and third year undergraduates, postgraduates and lecturers within Film Studies, Cultural and Media Studies.

List of illustrations Acknowledgements 1. First contact: Introducing technoscience 2. Resistance is futile? 3. The gremlin effect 4. It's alive 5. Technology untamed Conclusion Filmography Bibliography

Aylish Wood is Lecturer in Film Studies in the School of English at the University of Aberdeen.