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Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography

by Donald S Lopez Jr Princeton University Press
Pub Date:
02/2011
ISBN:
9780691134352
Format:
Hbk 192 pages
Price:
AU$46.99 NZ$48.69
Product Status: Available in Approx 14 days
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The Tibetan Book of the Dead is the most famous Buddhist text in the West, having sold more than a million copies since it was first published in English in 1927. Carl Jung wrote a commentary on it, Timothy Leary redesigned it as a guidebook for an acid trip, and the Beatles quoted Leary's version in their song 'Tomorrow Never Knows.' More recently, the book has been adopted by the hospice movement, enshrined by Penguin Classics, and made into an audiobook read by Richard Gere. Yet, as acclaimed writer and scholar of Buddhism Donald Lopez writes, 'The Tibetan Book of the Dead is not really Tibetan, it is not really a book, and it is not really about death.' In this compelling introduction and short history, Lopez tells the strange story of how a relatively obscure and malleable collection of Buddhist texts of uncertain origin came to be so revered--and so misunderstood--in the West. The central character in this story is Walter Evans-Wentz (1878-1965), an eccentric scholar and spiritual seeker from Trenton, New Jersey, who, despite not knowing the Tibetan language and never visiting the country, crafted and named The Tibetan Book of the Dead. In fact, Lopez argues, Evans-Wentz's book is much more American than Tibetan, owing a greater debt to Theosophy and Madame Blavatsky than to the lamas of the Land of Snows. Indeed, Lopez suggests that the book's perennial appeal stems not only from its origins in magical and mysterious Tibet, but also from the way Evans-Wentz translated the text into the language of a very American spirituality.


Acknowledgments ix

Introduction 1

Chapter 1: America 13

Chapter 2: India 30

Chapter 3: T ibet 49

Chapter 4: The World 71

Conclusion 128

Coda 153

Notes 157

Index 171

A scholarly and informative short read, very useful as a reminder that religious books are not necessarily fixed entities. -- James F. DeRoche, Library Journal
Donald S. Lopez, Jr., is the Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies at the University of Michigan. His many books include 'The Story of Buddhism' (HarperOne) and 'Prisoners of Shangri-La: Tibetan Buddhism and the West'. He has also edited a number of books by the Dalai Lama.