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Thug Life: Race, Gener, and the Meaning of Hip-Hop

by Michael Jeffries University of Chicago Press
Pub Date:
11/2010
ISBN:
9780226395845
Format:
Hbk 280 pages
Price:
AU$153.00 NZ$158.26
Product Status: Available in Approx 9 days
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Hip-hop has come a long way from its origins in the Bronx in the 1970s, when rapping and DJing were just part of a lively, decidedly local scene that also venerated break-dancing and graffiti. Now hip-hop is a global phenomenon and, in the United States, a massively successful corporate enterprise predominantly controlled and consumed by whites while the most prominent performers are black. How does this shift in racial dynamics affect our understanding of contemporary hip-hop, especially when the music perpetuates stereotypes of black men? Do black listeners interpret hip-hop differently from white fans?

These questions have dogged hip-hop for decades, but unlike most pundits, Michael P. Jeffries finds answers by interviewing everyday people. Instead of turning to performers or media critics, Thug Life focuses on the music’s fans—young men, both black and white—and the resulting account avoids romanticism, offering an unbiased examination of how hip-hop works in people’s daily lives. As Jeffries weaves the fans’ voices together with his own sophisticated analysis, we are able to understand hip-hop as a tool listeners use to make sense of themselves and society as well as a rich, self-contained world containing politics and pleasure, virtue and vice.

AcknowledgmentsIntroduction / State of the Hip-Hop UnionOne / The Meaning of Hip-HopTwo / From a Cool Complex to Complex CoolThree / Thug Life and Social DeathThe Bridge: Summary of Chapters Two and ThreeFour / Hip-Hop Authenticity in Black and WhiteFive / Parental Advisory: Explicit LyricsConclusion / The Last VerseEpilogue / Obama as Hip-Hop IconAppendixNotesReferencesDiscography

''Thug Life is a finely developed and sophisticated analysis of the complex terrain that is hip-hop. Jeffries' interdisciplinary scope is impressive; in addition to cultural criticism, elements of sociology, cultural history, literary criticism, and culture industry analysis inform the book, making it a fascinating read on several levels.'' - S. Craig Watkins, University of Texas at Austin''
Michael Jeffries is assistant professor of American studies at Wellesley College.