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What Teachers Should Know But Textbooks Don't Show

by Stella Erbes Corwin Press
Pub Date:
11/2007
ISBN:
9781412950688
Format:
Pbk 168 pages
Price:
AU$49.99 NZ$52.17
Product Status: Not Our Publication - we no longer distribute
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''I was once a brand new teacher and I know that nothing can be as frustrating to a young educator as the first year of teaching. Erbes helps guide new teachers through what may be their toughest year.''
—Janice Hahn, City Councilwoman Los Angeles, CA

''The author reminds us that teaching is about more than skills and strategies; it is about relationships and passion.''
—Marilyn Green, Director of Grants, Assessment, and Special Projects
Moorpark Unified School District, CA

''This resource offers practical advice—not just theory—on how to succeed in the crucial first year of teaching.''
—Erin Powers, Literacy and Leadership Partner
University of California, Los Angeles

Life lessons for surviving and thriving in the classroom!

Even with student teaching experience and education courses under their belts, most new teachers are unprepared for their first year in the classroom. Filled with practical insider information, this resource bridges the gap between instructional theory and practice.

This clear, concise, and reader-friendly text combines research, the author's personal experiences, and valuable insights from veteran educators to help new teachers:

Create a positive learning environment
Address classroom management issues while retaining their personal style
Connect with students
Collaborate with parents and families
Handle personal and professional challenges
This book is ideal for novice and prospective teachers as well as for mentor programs and parenting classes.

Acknowledgments
About the Author
Introduction
Part I. Planning and Preparing to Teach
1. Making Positive First Impressions
2. Making Time Through the Art of Multitasking
3. Making Grading Manageable
Part II. Classroom Management
4. Reinforcing Routines and Completing Clerical Tasks
5. Discipline: Setting Boundaries and Holding the Line
Part III. Instructional Strategies
6. Teaching Outside the Box
7. A Personal Touch: Incorporating the "Affective" Element
Part IV. Teaching: An Ensemble Work
8. Cooperate, Collaborate, & Consider the Office Staff
9. Parents & Teachers: We're on the Same Team
10. Participate in the Profession
Conclusion
Resources
References
Index

'Useful and motivational, practical and inspiring. Erbes not only provides teachers with valuable suggestions to make their lives easier and improve their craft, but also speaks to the heart of the matter. She reminds us that teaching is about more than skills and strategies; it is about relationships and passion.' Marilyn Green, Director of Grants, Assessment, and Special Projects 'This book answers the practical question of how to be an effective teacher while retaining the heart and soul, which are essential to becoming a successful educator. Erbes shares her personal expertise with honesty and clarity to inspire new teachers to create active learning environments where both the teacher and the students can thrive.' Donna Fulgham, Language Arts Teacher 'I was a brand new teacher right after college and I know that nothing can be as frustrating and disheartening to a young educator as the first year of teaching. Erbes uses her own journey and the experiences of others to help guide new teachers through what may be their toughest year. This book offers encouragement to help new teachers maintain their enthusiasm for teaching-the world's greatest profession.' Janice Hahn, City Councilwoman 'Erbes offers practical advice-not just theory-on how to succeed in the crucial first years of teaching. This book is filled with ideas on how to optimize teaching time and maximize student learning. By applying these guidelines, developing educators will have a better chance of being organized, thoughtful, and effective.' Erin Powers, Literacy and Leadership Partner 'Blends research with tips on the most challenging moments new teachers face in their classrooms, showing how to create a positive learning environment, handle students and families alike, and meet professional objectives. New teachers in particular will find it a clear, concise indicator of common problems and their solutions.' The Bookwatch, June 2008
Stella Erbes earned her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology and Masters Degrees in Education and Spanish from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her 16 years of teaching experiences span both the elementary and secondary levels as well as the public, private, and homeschooling sectors. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Teacher Education at Pepperdine University, where she teaches courses in Educational Psychology and Secondary Teaching Methods, and supervises student teachers. Although she enjoyed teaching in the K-12 classroom, Stella decided to begin a career in teacher education in 2002 so that she could support beginning teachers as they entered the world of teaching by sharing practical knowledge gained from her wide array of experiences. Stella research interests focus on beginning teacher support, teaching methodologies, and undergraduate research experiences. Her research has been presented at internationally recognized conferences like the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. It is her hope that K-12 classrooms and research in higher education can partner together more closely to connect theory and practice in valuable ways so that both classroom teachers and university professors can be well informed of the current issues and trends in today schools.