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Understanding Social Media

by Sam Hinton and Larissa Hjorth SAGE Publications Ltd
Pub Date:
07/2013
ISBN:
9781446201213
Format:
Pbk 168 pages
Price:
AU$65.00 NZ$66.09
Product Status: In Stock Now
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A critical and timely conceptual toolbox for navigating the evolution and practices of social media.

Taking an interdisciplinary and global, intercultural approach, this book provides a clear and concise explanation of the key concepts but also goes beyond specific brands, sites and practices to show readers how to place social media more critically within the changing media and cultural landscape.

Cutting across the many dimensions of social media, from the political, economic and visual, and with case studies in each chapter providing real-world examples of theory in action, this book explores the industries, ideologies and cultural practices that are increasingly becoming part of global popular culture.

COURSE USE: Upper-level undergraduate students of media studies, cultural studies and sociology

Introduction to Social Media
What Is Web 2.0?
Social Network Sites
Participation and User Created Content
Art and Cultural Production
Social Media Games
Social, Locative and Mobile Media
Conclusion

Really good text with key points covered.
Mrs Elvira Bolat, The Business School, Bournemouth University

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An excellent course text book brining coherence to a subject area which is relatively young. It uses recent research to back up its ideas and gives students using the book plenty of ideas to find sources for their own research. This is the best I have seen to date
Mr John Murphy, School of Humanities, Hertfordshire University

A useful text for those seeking to understand the potential of social media in their work with families.
Ms Angela Hilton, School of Education, Wolverhampton University

Understanding Social Media is a book that will be useful to those students who have not 'grown up' or engaged in social media. This book will be useful as a classroom resource to go over how visual imagery is at the forefront of social media and how it is incorporated into our everyday lives. I think it is a good starting point for debate and for grasping how visual images are used by both individuals and organisations on the web.
Ms Zoe Colburn, Arts, Leicester Adult Education College

Useful complementary reading for students studying marketing.
Ana Gaio, Cultural Policy and Management, City University
Sam Hinton - University of Canberra
Sam Hinton is a senior lecturer in media and course convener for the Media Arts and Production degree at the University of Canberra. He teaches units in introductory media production, motion graphics and 3D animation. This places him in the enviable position of being able to teach what he loves: using the computer as a creative tool. Sam's key academic interests include the sociological aspects of computer games and computer technologies, technical aspects of computer games, computer generated 3D graphics, the generation of procedural worlds and narratives, data visualisation (especially in relation to cultural materials), the philosophy and history of technology and network histories.

Sam is a past graduate of the professional writing degree at the University of Canberra, but his interests in computers and computing has taken him in strange and different directions. After graduating Sam worked briefly with The Canberra Times, then as a technical writer for an IT company. During this time he developed an interest in hypertext and the Internet, which at the time (1993) was only just emerging as a serious public medium in Australia. These interests led him to take up a job as publications officer for the Centre for Networked Information and Publishing at the Australian National University (ANU), where he was involved in a lot of early web design and development work at that institution.

Following his work at the ANU, Sam became involved in a federal government committee that established the basic guidelines for the publication of government information online. Sam left the ANU in 1998 to begin a PhD at La Trobe University in Melbourne. Sam's PhD is about the early development of the Internet in Australia.

From 1998 to 2003 Sam was also heavily involved as a programmer in the development of a modification ( or ''mod'') for the computer game Quake 3. At the invitation of Id Software (the people who make Quake), Sam flew over to Mesquite, Texas twice for Id Software's annual Quakecon where he helped his fellow mod team members showcase their mod.

In 2003 Sam joined the University of Canberra as a lecturer. He was awarded his PhD from La Trobe University in 2006 and has since been developing his research interests. He is currently working on research involving cultural interfaces as part of the Digital Design and Media research cluster within the Faculty of Arts and Design as well as a number of other personal projects.

Larissa Hjorth - School of Media and Communication, RMIT
Larissa Hjorth is researcher, artist and lecturer who has taught Media Cultures 1 & 2 and Narrative and Communication in the Games Programs since its inception in 2005. Since 2000, Hjorth has been researching and publishing on gendered customizing of mobile communication, gaming and virtual communities in the Asia–Pacific, much of which is detailed in her book, Mobile Media in the Asia-Pacific (London: Routledge, 2008). Hjorth has published widely on the topic in journals such as Convergence journal, Journal of Intercultural Studies, Continuum, ACCESS, Fibreculture and Southern Review.