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Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation 4ed

by David Chandler SAGE Publications, Inc
Pub Date:
06/2016
ISBN:
9781506310992
Format:
Pbk 488 pages
Price:
AU$184.00 NZ$186.96
Product Status: In Stock Now
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Available as eBook
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Blending theory with practical application, Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility, Fourth Edition is a comprehensive CSR text with a strong emphasis on strategy . Balancing theory and practical applications, the text is divided into two parts. The first half of the text provides an overview of the field, stakeholders perspective, CSR as a strategic filter, and how to implement CSR effectively. The second half of the book uses more than 20 cases to illustrate the organizational, economic, and societal issues surrounding CSR. The engaging cases capture contentious debates across the spectrum of CSR topics that culminate with a series of questions designed to stimulate further investigation and debate.


 


Key Features:


 



  • Part I contains five chapters that present a comprehensive overview of CSR, while also introducing new definitions and models to detail the innovative concept of strategic CSR.



 



  • Part II presents 21 in-depth and topical CSR issues and cases that capture the breadth and depth of this dynamic subject.



 



  • Each issue and case study in Part II provides numerous tools to facilitate discussion around CSR, such as Online Resources for Further Investigation, a Pro/Con Debate designed to capture the heart of the issue, and Questions for Discussion and Review.



 



  • An international perspective, supported by multiple examples, emphasizes the multi-cultural challenges of CSR and conducting business in a global context.



 



  • The Strategic CSR Newsletter, a freely available resource generated by the authors as a dynamic complement to this text, offers updates and topical commentary on the range of issues encompassing Strategic CSR. href="http://strategiccsr-sage.blogspot.com/">http://strategiccsr-sage.blogspot.com/ 



 


 


 


 

PART I: CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Chapter 1: What is CSR?
A New Definition of CSR
The Evolution of CSR
Foundations of CSR
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 2: The Driving Forces of CSR
Affluence
Sustainability
Globalization
Communication
Brands
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 3: Corporate Rights and Responsibilities
Corporate Rights
Corporate Responsibilities
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Case-Study: Religion
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Next Steps
PART II: A STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVE
Chapter 4: Stakeholder Theory
Who is a Stakeholder
Which Stakeholders Should be Prioritized?
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 5: Corporate Stakeholder Responsibility
CSR: A Corporate Responsibility?
CSR: A Stakeholder Responsibility?
Engaged Stakeholders
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 6: Who Owns the Corporation?
History of the Corporation
Shareholders Own Stock
Fiduciary Duties
Shareholders vs. Stakeholders
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Case-Study: Impact Investing
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Next Steps
PART III: An Economic Perspective
Chapter 7: The Pursuit of Profit
Markets
Profit
Social Progress
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 8: Incentives and Compliance
Behavioral Economics
Walmart
Is Walmart Good for Society?
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 9: Accountability
Defining CSR
Measuring CSR
Pricing CSR
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Case-Study: Financial Crisis
Countrywide
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Next Steps
PART IV: A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE
Chapter 10: Strategy + CSR
What is Strategy?
Competing Strategy Perspectives
The Integration of Strategy and CSR
The CSR Threshold
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 11: CSR as a Strategic Filter
The CSR Filter
The Market for CSR
The CSR Filter in Action
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 12: Strategic CSR
Defining Strategic CSR
Strategic CSR is Not and Option
Strategic CSR is Business
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Case-Study: Supply Chain
An Ethical Supply Chain
An Unethical Supply Chain
A Strategic Supply Chain
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Next Steps
PART V: A SUSTAINABLE PERSPECTIVE
Chapter 13: Sustainability
Sustainable Development
Waste
Beyond Sustainability
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 14: Implementing CSR
Strategic Planning
Short to Medium Term
Medium to Long Term
The Socially Responsible Firm
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Chapter 15: Sustainable Value Creation
Values, Morals, and Business Ethics
Creating Value
Values-based Business
Strategic CSR is Good Business
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Case-Study: Employees
The Gig Economy
Employee-centered Firms
Strategic CSR Debate
Questions for Discussion and Review
Final Thoughts

I’ve been using this text to support learning in two classes I teach, Managing for Sustainability and Global Corporate Social Responsibility. I found it to be a strong support for my approach, which involves situation studies and roundtable discussions pertinent to each course. David Chandler’s approach works well for many reasons.



• Current discussions in our US government particularly render it difficult to focus on public policy influences on sustainability and social responsibility, or to promote ethical actions based on altruism. Business administration students may be biased toward a tendency to perceive profits as paramount, and non-business students attracted to the course topics may end up affirming one another’s perceived goodness without learning how to negotiate corporate-influenced environments.

• A vision of perfection may supplant the good that can come of more strategic CSR approaches. A firm’s capacity to genuinely address social challenges ranging from environmental concerns to social equity need not preclude profitability. Corporations’ opening to, and funding of, design and innovation can be important drivers to managing the natural resources left in the world and creating new ways to benefit everyone.

• While taking some issue with Milton Friedman’s notions of what business responsibility comprises (solely to make money), Chandler believes that CSR students have much to learn from the Nobel-prize winning economist, and I agree. Profitability, however, does need to be viewed over the long term as much as the short term. What do we profit in a desolate, ruined environment? If corporations come to the table in meaningful discussion surrounding the balance we “sustainers” seek, perhaps we would move in the right direction. There would be no losers, only investors.

• Strategic CSR seeks to assure profitability through enhanced relationship with all stakeholders, not just shareholders. As Chandler asserts, CSR is a responsibility among firms to meet the needs of their stakeholders and it’s a responsibility among stakeholders to hold firms to account for their actions.



Today’s interplay of business and society is complex and fraught with nuance. Conversations and understanding must evolve further to ensure a sustainable global future. This book offers plenty of material – and outstanding faculty resources – to support an instructor’s approach to helping students learn to mindfully manage people and resources in the world as it is, to the benefit of all: people, planet, and economic stability.
David Chandler