Request Inspection Copy

If you are an Academic or Teacher and wish to consider this book as a prescribed textbook for your course, you may be eligible for a complimentary inspection copy. Please complete this form, including information about your position, campus and course, before adding to cart.

* Required Fields

To complete your Inspection Copy Request you will need to click the Checkout button in the right margin and complete the checkout formalities. You can include Inspection Copies and purchased items in the same shopping cart, see our Inspection Copy terms for further information.

Any Questions? Please email our text Support Team on text@footprint.com.au

Submit

Email this to a friend

* ALL required Fields

Order Inspection Copy

An inspection copy has been added to your shopping cart

Why North is Up: Map Conventions and Where They Came From

by Mick Ashworth
Pub Date:
08/2019
ISBN:
9781851245192
Format:
Hbk 224 pages
Price:
AU$52.99 NZ$54.77
Product Status: In Stock Now
add to your cart
Many people have a love of maps. But what lies behind the process of map-making? How have cartographers through the centuries changed their craft and established a language of maps which helps them to better represent our world and users to understand it?


 


This book tells the story of how widely accepted mapping


conventions originated and evolved – from map orientation, projections, typography and scale, to the use of colour, map symbols, ways of representing relief and the treatment of boundaries and place names. It charts the fascinating story of how conventions have changed in response to new technologies and ever-changing mapping requirements, how symbols can be a matter of life or death, why universal acceptance of conventions can be difficult to achieve and how new mapping conventions are developing to meet the needs of modern cartography. Here is an accessible and enlightening guide to the sometimes hidden techniques of map-making through the centuries.
"In this handsome and informative book, Mick Ashworth picks through the conventions that have shaped cartography thus far, in a lively narrative augmented by lavish illustrations of the maps in question. For map addicts and casual bystanders alike, this is a terrific work that both entertains and enlightens."
 
Mick Ashworth is Director of Ashworth Maps and Interpretation Ltd and Consultant Editor to 'The Times Atlas of the World'. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.